Tag Archives: John Romita Jr.

Why Mark Millar Spells Doom For Fox-Marvel

Mark Millar was just recently announced to be 20th Century Fox’s “creative consultant” for their line of Marvel movies. I couldn’t imagine a worse person to choose.

Let’s get this out of the way, okay? I don’t like Mark Millar’s body of work. It tends to be crass, juvenile, demented, adolescent wish-fulfillment where everyone curses like a sailor, people explode into buckets of blood and gore when they die (and boy do a lot of people die in Millar’s stories), and everyone but the main character is a warped misogynist. Kick-Ass 2 is especially guilty of this, where the villain of the story, known, sigh, as The Mother-Fucker, shoots a bunch of children for no real reason and then rapes the protagonist’s girlfriend, all to show how evil and sick he is. Really, Millar? That’s the extent of your imagination? Don’t get me started on Nemesis, where the villain kidnaps the hero’s daughter and son, impregnates the daughter with the son’s sperm, and then rigs the daughter’s uterus to collapse if they attempt an abortion. These are actual words that Mark Millar actually wrote down that were actually published.

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Review: The Amazing Spider-Man 696 (with sundry complaints about the series generally)

2 out of 5 stars
Marvel Comics
Writers- Dan Slott & Christos Gage
Art- Giuseppe Camuncoli
Inks- Dan Green
Colors- Antonio Fabela

I never thought I would say this (like, ever) but I am glad, nay, thoroughly satisfied, that The Amazing Spider-Man will be coming to an end in a mere four issues. I don’t say this out of some longstanding hatred of the series. In fact, ASM has always been my favorite comic book. I grew up reading Spider-Man. Many of my fondest memories as a Spidey fan were during what I consider the “Golden Age” of Spider-Man comics: the John Romita Jr. and J. Michael Straczynski run. Those comics were exactly what Spider-Man was supposed to be. Romita was an expert in kinetic, fun, evocative art with facial expressions that said ten times what was contained in thought bubbles, and fight scenes so beautifully and perfectly rendered, you could feel his ribs crack as Morlun pounded him or the thrill of success when Spider-Man finally found a way to physically overcome the vampire. There was glory and thrill and a feel of classic comic book storytelling in those books. As far as I’m concerned, that was Spider-Man. But those days are long gone, aren’t they? I think ASM’s “jumping the shark” moment came a long time ago, during the Brand New Day/One More Day line. And it has all been downhill from there.

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